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Even as young adults, male chimps are 'mama's boys'

Even tough male chimps need their moms. Chimpanzees live in a male-dominated society, where most of their valuable allies are other males. However, as young male chimpanzees become adults, they continue to maintain tight bonds with their mothers, a new study reveals

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In face of climate change, West Coast's butterfly populations continue to plummet

Pacific Grove this time of the year usually draws thousands of visitors in search of clusters of western monarch butterflies. But as insect populations plummet worldwide, there are few if any  monarchs to see in “Butterfly Town, U.S.A.”  this year. 

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Clean up efforts won't solve the plastic pollution crisis in the world's seas

A model simulating a device touted to clear plastic from the “Great Pacific garbage patch” shows that it would collect much less than 1 percent of the ocean’s plastic pollution by 2150.

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Researchers use virtual reality to show dangers of  sea level rise

Team uses virtual reality to show a Santa Cruz affected by sea level rise

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Santa Cruz County revises ordinance on rooster restrictions

Proposed ordinance reworded to target only gamecocks

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Ambitious project races to read genomes of 71,000 species

UCSC Genomics Institute researchers contribute to learning more about vertebrates

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Bird sanctuary raises concerns about proposed rooster limits

Proposed ordinance targeting cockfighting ruffles feathers at sanctuary that helps abandoned roosters

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Professors explain the social cost of carbon

In a Q&A, Stanford economists discuss the importance of this number and its role in creating environmental policies.

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Stanford model reveals surprising disconnect between physical characteristics and genetic ancestry in certain populations

Stanford biologists have built a model examining the relationship between physical traits and genetic ancestry in populations formed from the mixture of multiple founding groups. They found that the relationship dissipates over generations.

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Plastic ingestion by fish a growing problem

Stanford ecologists have conducted one of the most detailed and comprehensive analyses of fish plastic ingestion by marine fish and shown that the rate of consumption is increasing. The work also reveals emerging trends about why certain species are at higher risk.

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How diseases and history are intertwined

In an introductory seminar course, students explored how vector-borne diseases have influenced history and found that they often most heavily impacted marginalized communities

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Very Good Space Boys: Robotic Dogs May Dig Into Martian Caves

Four-legged, autonomous robots known as “Mars Dogs” will explore previously inaccessible caves to look for signs of life and potential locations for future human colonies.

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Everything You Wanted to Know About Wildfires and its Aftermath

UCSC Science Communication students answer Good Times readers questions about wildfires

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Even as young adults, male chimps are 'mama's boys'

Even tough male chimps need their moms. Chimpanzees live in a male-dominated society, where most of their valuable allies are other males. However, as young male chimpanzees become adults, they continue to maintain tight bonds with their mothers, a new study reveals

Monarch.jpg

In face of climate change, West Coast's butterfly populations continue to plummet

Pacific Grove this time of the year usually draws thousands of visitors in search of clusters of western monarch butterflies. But as insect populations plummet worldwide, there are few if any  monarchs to see in “Butterfly Town, U.S.A.”  this year. 

Mongabay Image 1.jpg

Clean up efforts won't solve the plastic pollution crisis in the world's seas

A model simulating a device touted to clear plastic from the “Great Pacific garbage patch” shows that it would collect much less than 1 percent of the ocean’s plastic pollution by 2150.